Providing practical information to help you protect your farm from biosecurity risks

Mango pests

 

High priority exotic pests

The following are some of the high priority exotic pests of mangoes, as identified in the development of the Industry Biosecurity Plan for the Mango Industry.

Any of these pests would have serious consequences should they enter and become established in Australia. Additional information is included in the fact sheets. Implementing biosecurity measures to control endemic pests will go a long way towards preventing exotic pests from entering and becoming established on your farm.

For a complete list of exotic pest threats for mangoes, contact the Australian Mango Industry Association for a copy of the industry biosecurity plan.

Oriental fruit fly complex

Oriental fruit fly complex

Photo by Scott Bauer

 

  • Can cause up to 100% fruit loss
  • Adults 6-8 mm long with a narrow brown band along the edge of the wings
  • Abdomen has a distinctive black T-shaped mark, which is similar to a number of other endemic species
  • Larval feeding can result in rotting of fruit and may cause fruit to drop
  • Long range dispersal through movement of larvae-infested fruit

Fact sheet

Mango pulp weevil

Mango pulp weevil

Sternochetus frigidus. Photo by Dr Mohd. Shamsudin Osman, MARDI, Malaysia

  • Causes high economic losses to mango industries in Asia
  • Adults are 6-9 mm long, stout, and dark brown with paler patches
  • Unlike the Mango seed weevil, larvae only feed on the pulp
  • Circular exit holes appear in the fruit when adult weevils emerge
  • Long range dispersal through movement of infested fruit

Fact sheet

Mango malformation disease

Mango malformation disease

Fusarium mangiferae. Photo by Barry Conde, Department of Resources Northern Territory

  • Found in India, Egypt, Africa, Central America, Brazil, Mexico, Malaysia, Pakistan
  • Most important floral disease of mangoes worldwide
  • Causes malformed shoots and inflorescences
  • Panicles are thickened with large flowers and inflorescences appear crowded
  • Long range dispersal via infected plant material and pruning equipment

Fact sheet

Mango gall midges

Mango gall midge

Procontarinia spp. Photo by DEEDI

  • Found in India, Africa, Malaysia
  • Eggs laid on leaves cause small red spots
  • Wart-like galls form quickly and extend up to 3-4 mm in diameter
  • Heavily galled leaves can curl up and drop off prematurely, causing dieback of whole branches in susceptible cultivars
  • Long range dispersal through movement of infested plant material

Fact sheet

Red banded mango caterpillar

Red banded mango caterpillar

Deanolis sublimbalis. Photo by Glynn Maynard, DAFF, PaDil

  • Found in Southeast Asia, Papua New Guinea, Torres Strait Islands and quarantined on the tip of Cape Peninsula
  • Larvae have distinctive red and white bands plus a black collar
  • Damaging to all stages of fruit development, feeding on both flesh and seed
  • Caterpillar entry holes lead to sap stain on fruit
  • Long range dispersal through movement of infested plant material

Fact sheet

Blue-striped nettle grub

Blue-striped nettle grub

Parasa lepida. Photo by DEEDI

  • Found in Vietnam, Indonesia, China, Papua New Guinea
  • Larvae have thick, green fleshy bodies with three pale blue longitudinal stripes
  • Cocoons are buried in soil or among leaf litter
  • Grubs chew holes in leaves; larger infestations lead to defoliation of entire trees
  • Long range dispersal through movement of infested plant material

Fact sheet

Mango fruit borer

Mango fruit borer

Citripestis eutraphera. Photo by Lanni Zhang, Department of Resources Northern Territory

  • Found in India, Indonesia and parts of the Northern Territory
  • Larvae are reddish violet, and turn dark blue as they develop
  • Larvae feed on pulp
  • Causes premature fruit drop, particularly in young fruit
  • Long range dispersal through movement of infested fruit

Fact sheet

Mango sudden decline syndrome

Mango sudden death syndrome

Ceratocytis spp. Photo by Ali Obaid Al-Adawi, Ministry of Agriculture, Sultanate of Oman

  • Found in Brazil, Pakistan, Oman
  • Symptoms vary depending on which species of Ceratocystis is present
  • Causes parts or all of the tree to wilt and die
  • Blue-grey to brown staining of vascular tissue
  • Lifecycle not well understood but likely spread with the Mango bark beetle

Fact sheet

Remain observant for anything unusual in your orchard and storage facilities. If a pest is found that is not normally present on your property, it may be new not only to your property, but to the region, state or even Australia.