What is Farm Biosecurity

Farm biosecurity is a set of measures designed to protect a property from the entry and spread of pests and diseases. Farm biosecurity is your responsibility, and that of every person visiting or working on your property.

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Farm Biosecurity Toolkit

We have tools, tips and manuals to help you implement farm biosecurity on your property. You will also find individual profiles for a range of livestock and crops: or you can create a profile tailored to your farm.

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Biosecurity Essentials

The best defence against pests and diseases is to implement sound biosecurity practices on your farm. Quick and simple measures built into everyday practice will help protect your farm and your future.

Farm inputs

Almost anything moved onto your property can be a potential source of pests and diseases for livestock and plants. Monitor animals or plant materials that enter the property, as well as sources of water, feed and fertiliser.

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Farm outputs

Responsibility for biosecurity doesn’t end when plant products or animals leave the farm gate. The measures in place on your property support biosecurity in your region.

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Ferals and weeds

Feral animals, plant pests and weeds are a widespread nuisance but can also cause harm to your business, so they need to be actively controlled.

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People, vehicles & equipment

If it can move, it can carry diseases, pests and weeds. That's why people, vehicles and equipment pose a high biosecurity risk and should be managed accordingly.

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Production practices

Good on-farm hygiene reduces the risk of spreading pests and diseases. You can implement simple hygiene practices with feed and water sources, product packaging, storage facilities, livestock husbandry, waste materials and plant propagation.

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Train, plan & record

Ensure that staff are well trained and that you have the ability to trace where animals or plants have come from and where they went. Keep accurate records of purchases, sales and movements.

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News & Events

26 February 2021
The importance of records in an incursion

If you sometimes feel like you are drowning in paperwork, be reassured that keeping records is a genuinely useful biosecurity practice. If you ever find yourself caught up in a pest or disease incursion, the records you keep will be invaluable both to you and other producers in your industry.

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26 February 2021
Integrated pest management best option for new leaf miner

Serpentine leafminer (Liriomyza huidobrensis) is a new pest to arrive in Australia, first reported in NSW in Greater Sydney in October 2020, and then also in the Fassifern Valley Queensland. Research shows this pest is that it is resistant to the chemical treatments used to control other leafminers. Therefore, an integrated pest management (IPM) regime is important to control the pest.

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26 February 2021
African swine fever still a threat

Several years on from the arrival of African swine fever (ASF) in Asia, the deadly pig disease remains right on Australia’s doorstep. With the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations issuing a heightened risk alert for the region, Animal Health Australia (AHA) is urging land managers and especially pig owners in Australia to be incredibly disciplined in how they manage their property biosecurity.

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26 February 2021
Balancing rights and responsibilities on the land

When it comes to on-farm biosecurity it is often said that if it moves, it can carry diseases, pests and weeds. The movement of people, vehicles and equipment creates a high risk of a biosecurity incursion, second only to the introduction of new plants, livestock and farm supplies (such as feed). With governments encouraging people to travel within Australia (despite constantly changing COVID-19 restrictions), Animal Health Australia (AHA) is encouraging all people to consider the impact their actions have on rural environments.

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17 December 2020
Have a merry Christmas and a biosecure New Year

As the holidays are now upon us and following the lifting of many restrictions imposed due to COVID-19, many Australians will be looking to travel to visit family and friends, or simply get out of town. Animal Health Australia is reminding anyone travelling or expecting guests to be aware of the biosecurity implications that come with travel to our farms, national parks and other regional areas at this time of year. Don’t forget that any movement of people, vehicles and equipment can create new pathways for a biosecurity incursion.

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17 December 2020
Check before you pack and go

Inspectors at border checkpoints on main roads between states and at airports are still looking for fruit and veggies that can’t be moved between states.

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17 December 2020
A biosecurity boost for Tasmania

Producers in Tasmania will once again have access to an animal health monitoring and biosecurity network, funded by Animal Health Australia (AHA) and the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. The network, coordinated by veterinarian Dr Bruce Jackson, aims to bring together service providers – such as private veterinarians, stock agents, rural merchandisers and shearing contractors – to conduct livestock health monitoring during their time spent on-farm, especially those with sheep.

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17 December 2020
Pick up fallen fruit in orchards

Christina Cook, Manager of the National Fruit Fly Council, is reminding people that it’s not a good idea to leave fallen fruit in an orchard.

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27 November 2020
Moving it? Declare it!

If one thing is clear about travelling in 2020, it’s how important it is to be upfront about where you’ve been and make sure you have the correct paperwork for the journey. During a disease outbreak, knowing where each new case has come from is vitally important to understand how the disease is spreading.

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27 November 2020
Are you on standby to stand still?

Have you considered what you’d do if your livestock were unable to leave your property when you want or need them too? There’s a lot to consider when faced with the possibility of keeping livestock in place indefinitely, especially the availability of feed, water and other supplies. You may end up missing key dates in your calendar, such as shows, sales or sending your livestock to a processor.

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secure your farm: secure your future

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