What is Farm Biosecurity

Farm biosecurity is a set of measures designed to protect a property from the entry and spread of pests and diseases. Farm biosecurity is your responsibility, and that of every person visiting or working on your property.

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Farm Biosecurity Toolkit

We have tools, tips and manuals to help you implement farm biosecurity on your property. You will also find individual profiles for a range of livestock and crops: or you can create a profile tailored to your farm.

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Biosecurity Essentials

The best defence against pests and diseases is to implement sound biosecurity practices on your farm. Quick and simple measures built into everyday practice will help protect your farm and your future.

Farm inputs

Almost anything moved onto your property can be a potential source of pests and diseases for livestock and plants. Monitor animals or plant materials that enter the property, as well as sources of water, feed and fertiliser.

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Farm outputs

Responsibility for biosecurity doesn’t end when plant products or animals leave the farm gate. The measures in place on your property support biosecurity in your region.

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Ferals and weeds

Feral animals, plant pests and weeds are a widespread nuisance but can also cause harm to your business, so they need to be actively controlled.

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People, vehicles & equipment

If it can move, it can carry diseases, pests and weeds. That's why people, vehicles and equipment pose a high biosecurity risk and should be managed accordingly.

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Production practices

Good on-farm hygiene reduces the risk of spreading pests and diseases. You can implement simple hygiene practices with feed and water sources, product packaging, storage facilities, livestock husbandry, waste materials and plant propagation.

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Train, plan & record

Ensure that staff are well trained and that you have the ability to trace where animals or plants have come from and where they went. Keep accurate records of purchases, sales and movements.

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News & Events

21 June 2019
Introducing the new-look Farm Biosecurity website

Sourcing information on how to secure your farm against diseases, pests and weeds just became a whole lot easier, with growers and producers now having improved access to a vast suite of resources on the Farm Biosecurity website.

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21 June 2019
Farm biosecurity is business as usual for growers

Vegetable and potato growers Tim Carnell and Scott Rockliff may run businesses at opposite ends of Australia, but they are both aware of the biosecurity measures that are important to them.

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21 June 2019
Spotted something unusual? Now what?

There’s a new course available on Plant Health Australia’s Biosecurity Online Training (BOLT) site on the topic of reporting new pests and diseases, and some of the steps that may be taken in the early stages of an incursion.

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21 June 2019
With best friends like these, who needs enemies?

The relationship between people and dogs has benefitted both for generations, so much so that the farmer and their dog is an iconic image in our industry. Yet wild dogs can be one of the biggest killers for affected farmers; not only do they directly prey on livestock, their simple presence can cause a big biosecurity headache.

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20 May 2019
Biosecurity manual helps cherry growers access markets

A new version of the Biosecurity Manual for Cherry Growers is now available on the Farm Biosecurity website.The updated manual stems from a review of the biosecurity plan for the entire industry, something that is done every five years or so to make sure that biosecurity activities are still targeting the highest priority pests.

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17 May 2019
Break the pest cycle before sowing

With challenging and dry conditions prevailing this year, Grains Biosecurity Officer Jim Moran recommends staying one step ahead of pests by using farm biosecurity practices before and during sowing.

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17 May 2019
What to expect when you’re detecting

With a positive detection for Johne’s disease (JD) on a New South Wales north coast cattle stud having been confirmed by NSW DPI, questions about what this means for properties with a confirmed clinical case of JD have been asked, particularly in relation to the relatively new framework for management of the disease.

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17 May 2019
You can’t wash your hands of your biosecurity practices

Livestock producers can often see biosecurity as something that happens in a particular moment in time, such as when new livestock enter the property, when livestock leave for or return from agistment, or when an animal begins showing signs of a disease or pest problem.

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17 May 2019
Biosecurity begins with people

On-farm biosecurity has always been important, yet over the last few years its implementation has become far more visible. This serves the producer by keeping them aware of and managing people moving onto and about their property, and the associated risks.A more recent issue we’ve seen is activists who have, in several high-profile cases nationwide, taken it upon themselves to enter properties without consent in order to bring attention to their opposition to livestock farming.

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17 May 2019
Saleyards ramp up biosecurity

AHA has teamed up with representatives from the Australian Livestock Markets Association (ALMA) and the Northern Territory Cattlemen’s Association (NTCA) to develop a comprehensive biosecurity plan template for saleyards.

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farmbiosecurity.com.au is part of the Farm Biosecurity Program, a joint initiative of Animal Health Australia (AHA) and Plant Health Australia (PHA) managed on behalf of members.